Edge Fitness Fit, Fab, and Fiesty

Healthy recipes, fitness tips, and motivation!

<p>Do you see what I see? 42 minutes on the stairmaster. According to the stairmaster (which had my weight entered in) I burned nearly 700 calories. SWEET! That has got to have earned me a cheeseburger…right? Unfortunately, no. See that watch on my wrist? That is connected to the heart rate monitor strapped around my chest. According to it, I only burned a measly 300 calories. Now let’s be fair, 300 calories is not <i>measly</i>. But in comparison to 700, it seems small. </p><p>Unfortunately, many people take these numbers to heart. They come into the gym and run on the treadmill for 30 minutes and grossly overestimate the amount of calories that they burned. They think their little 30 minute run earned them 2 slices of cake after dinner. And that is just not the case. Now don’t get me wrong…I am all about moderation. If you want that cake, EAT IT! But maybe just have one slice. And realize that it is a splurge…not something to do on a regular basis if fat lose is the goal. </p>

Do you see what I see? 42 minutes on the stairmaster. According to the stairmaster (which had my weight entered in) I burned nearly 700 calories. SWEET! That has got to have earned me a cheeseburger…right? Unfortunately, no. See that watch on my wrist? That is connected to the heart rate monitor strapped around my chest. According to it, I only burned a measly 300 calories. Now let’s be fair, 300 calories is not measly. But in comparison to 700, it seems small. 

Unfortunately, many people take these numbers to heart. They come into the gym and run on the treadmill for 30 minutes and grossly overestimate the amount of calories that they burned. They think their little 30 minute run earned them 2 slices of cake after dinner. And that is just not the case. Now don’t get me wrong…I am all about moderation. If you want that cake, EAT IT! But maybe just have one slice. And realize that it is a splurge…not something to do on a regular basis if fat lose is the goal. 

Posted 88 weeks ago
<p><span>“Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God?  You are not your own; you were bought at a price.  Therefore honor God with your body," </span><span></span></p>
<p><span>-Corinthians 6:19-20.</span><span></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">I had heard this several times when I was younger. Yet I disregarded it and continued to treat my body, my temple, my gift from God in a way that was unpleasing to him.</p>
<p class="MsoNormal"> I believe the weight loss journey I experienced truly helped me grow in my spiritual life. I was able to realize that I was not only disrespecting myself by eating poorly and exercising rarely, I was also disrespecting God. He honored me with this body. He blessed me with a fully functioning and able body and I was taking it for granted. And unfortunately that has become common day now. Obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and other preventable diseases are on the rise all across America. These are all diseases that could be easily avoided by eating healthily on incorporating exercise into your daily routine.</p>

<p class="MsoNormal">So I challenge you today: not only to live a healthier life physically, but to live a healthier life spiritually. Learn to respect yourself But more importantly, learn to respect your God.  </p>

“Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God?  You are not your own; you were bought at a price.  Therefore honor God with your body," 

-Corinthians 6:19-20.

I had heard this several times when I was younger. Yet I disregarded it and continued to treat my body, my temple, my gift from God in a way that was unpleasing to him.

 I believe the weight loss journey I experienced truly helped me grow in my spiritual life. I was able to realize that I was not only disrespecting myself by eating poorly and exercising rarely, I was also disrespecting God. He honored me with this body. He blessed me with a fully functioning and able body and I was taking it for granted. And unfortunately that has become common day now. Obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and other preventable diseases are on the rise all across America. These are all diseases that could be easily avoided by eating healthily on incorporating exercise into your daily routine.

So I challenge you today: not only to live a healthier life physically, but to live a healthier life spiritually. Learn to respect yourself But more importantly, learn to respect your God.  

Posted 221 weeks ago
<p>Trivia time? Which weighs more…muscle or fat? Think about it. Think long and hard. I’ll give you a minute…doo doo doo doo doo(jeopardy theme song playing in the background…) TIMES UP! What did you say? If you are like many people, you probably said muscle. NOT TRUE! It’s like the old joke “Which weighs more? A pound of feathers or a pound of bricks?” It’s a trick question. They both weigh a pound!</p>
<p>So one pound of muscle = one pound of fat. The difference comes in the volume. One pound of fat takes up much more space on our body than one pound of muscle does.</p>
<p>It is also less metabolically active. For every one extra pound of muscle that you gain, that is 50-100 calories extra that you burn every day. Now that might not seem like much, but if you add 5 pounds of muscle over a year, that’s potentially 500 extra calories you are burning EVERY DAY! Talk about awesome! Random Sunday fitness facts courtesy of yours truly (:</p>

Trivia time? Which weighs more…muscle or fat? Think about it. Think long and hard. I’ll give you a minute…doo doo doo doo doo(jeopardy theme song playing in the background…) TIMES UP! What did you say? If you are like many people, you probably said muscle. NOT TRUE! It’s like the old joke “Which weighs more? A pound of feathers or a pound of bricks?” It’s a trick question. They both weigh a pound!

So one pound of muscle = one pound of fat. The difference comes in the volume. One pound of fat takes up much more space on our body than one pound of muscle does.

It is also less metabolically active. For every one extra pound of muscle that you gain, that is 50-100 calories extra that you burn every day. Now that might not seem like much, but if you add 5 pounds of muscle over a year, that’s potentially 500 extra calories you are burning EVERY DAY! Talk about awesome! Random Sunday fitness facts courtesy of yours truly (:

Posted 222 weeks ago
<p><strong>Preventing Eating Disorders: Ways to Help Children and Teens Develop Healthy Relationships with Food.</strong></p>

<p class="MsoNormal">Have you looked at a fashion magazine recently? Elle, Vogue, Cosmopolitan? Notice anything about them? How about the unrealistic weight of all the “models?” I put that in quotes because I personally don’t want to think of these girls as models. Unfortunately, many girls look up to these women as role models. What they don’t realize is how fake these images are. Don’t believe me, check out this link:  <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wA331SpzYy4">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wA331SpzYy4</a> Technology has taken us pretty far. And unfortunately this has led to these unrealistic expectations for young girls and boys.</p>
<p class="MsoNormal">While obesity is an epidemic in America these days, eating disorders have grown in numbers as well. According to the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), 60% of children between the ages of 6 and 12 worry about their weight and over half of American teens think they are overweight. This leads to poor self-image which can eventually lead to a slew of issues from fad dieting to eating disorders.  And it’s not just girls that are affected. A recent study in <em>JAMA</em> <em>Pediatrics </em>found that 31% of boys ages 12-18 had binged and/or purged on food.</p>
<p class="MsoNormal">So with such a rising rate of disordered eating, what can we do to prevent it in children? I am glad you asked (:</p>
<p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpFirst"><!--[if !supportLists]--><strong>1.<span>       </span></strong><!--[endif]--><strong>Teach proper eating habits/patterns. </strong>Remember the clean plate club? Well you shouldn’t. Teaching your kids to eat until all their food is gone will lead them to think that is the “right” thing to do. Instead of asking “Are you full?” ask “Are you satisfied?” This way your child learns how to stop when they have had enough.</p>
<p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><!--[if !supportLists]--><strong>2.<span>       </span></strong><!--[endif]--><strong>Don’t label food as “bad.</strong>” When we label food as “bad” (i.e. cookies, cakes, cheese, fats, etc.) we crave them more. By making them taboo, we want to rebel and eat them. Everything in moderation. Don’t make them feel guilty for the things that they eat. Instead, help them pay attention to how they feel after they eat certain things. If they notice that they feel lethargic after eating a large chocolate bar, they will be less likely to eat it again. Alternatively, if they notice that when they eat a healthy, well balanced diet that they have more energy, they will want to eat that way more often.</p>
<p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><!--[if !supportLists]--><strong>3.<span>       </span></strong><!--[endif]--><strong>Model healthy eating.</strong> Practice what you preach guys! If you tell your kids to eat slowly and enjoy their food, but then they see you scarfing down a sandwich while talking on the phone, it will be hard to take you seriously. Model what you want your kids to do when it comes to eating: sit down and eat slowly, eat at the table with family, eat well balanced meals, eat REGULAR meals (i.e. don’t skip meals), etc. You are a HUGE role model to your children. If you don’t want your kids to do it, don’t do it yourself.</p>
<p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><!--[if !supportLists]--><strong>4.<span>       </span></strong><!--[endif]--><strong>Reframe the cultural messages.</strong> Media teaches children that thin is in, fat is bad, food is for pleasure, and other things that are not true. Since we can’t get rid of the media or change the images it portrays, talk to your kids about the messages that the media portrays. Teach them that health is about more than just being a size two. Pay attention to their self-image. And be careful with your language, especially if you have some self-image issues too. If they hear you talk about how awful you look in those jeans, they will think their body’s worth is based on image alone.</p>
<p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><!--[if !supportLists]--><strong>5.<span>       </span></strong><!--[endif]--><strong>Don’t you the “D” word.</strong> Dieting. DON’T USE IT! The word diet has a bad connotation and children will think they are being deprived if you use the word “diet”.  Instead, talk about healthy eating and lifestyle changes.</p>

<p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpLast"><!--[if !supportLists]--><strong>6.<span>       </span></strong><!--[endif]--><strong>Cook with your kids.</strong> When kids have a role in the cooking and planning of meals, they feel more empowered. Bring them into the kitchen, let them help plan meals, take them grocery shopping with you. When at the store, tell them benefits of some food (“blueberries help your memory”) and let them pick interesting things that maybe you wouldn’t have tried like white asparagus. By getting them active in this aspect of their life, they feel like they have more control over what they eat. </p>

Preventing Eating Disorders: Ways to Help Children and Teens Develop Healthy Relationships with Food.

Have you looked at a fashion magazine recently? Elle, Vogue, Cosmopolitan? Notice anything about them? How about the unrealistic weight of all the “models?” I put that in quotes because I personally don’t want to think of these girls as models. Unfortunately, many girls look up to these women as role models. What they don’t realize is how fake these images are. Don’t believe me, check out this link:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wA331SpzYy4 Technology has taken us pretty far. And unfortunately this has led to these unrealistic expectations for young girls and boys.

While obesity is an epidemic in America these days, eating disorders have grown in numbers as well. According to the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), 60% of children between the ages of 6 and 12 worry about their weight and over half of American teens think they are overweight. This leads to poor self-image which can eventually lead to a slew of issues from fad dieting to eating disorders.  And it’s not just girls that are affected. A recent study in JAMA Pediatrics found that 31% of boys ages 12-18 had binged and/or purged on food.

So with such a rising rate of disordered eating, what can we do to prevent it in children? I am glad you asked (:

1.       Teach proper eating habits/patterns. Remember the clean plate club? Well you shouldn’t. Teaching your kids to eat until all their food is gone will lead them to think that is the “right” thing to do. Instead of asking “Are you full?” ask “Are you satisfied?” This way your child learns how to stop when they have had enough.

2.       Don’t label food as “bad.” When we label food as “bad” (i.e. cookies, cakes, cheese, fats, etc.) we crave them more. By making them taboo, we want to rebel and eat them. Everything in moderation. Don’t make them feel guilty for the things that they eat. Instead, help them pay attention to how they feel after they eat certain things. If they notice that they feel lethargic after eating a large chocolate bar, they will be less likely to eat it again. Alternatively, if they notice that when they eat a healthy, well balanced diet that they have more energy, they will want to eat that way more often.

3.       Model healthy eating. Practice what you preach guys! If you tell your kids to eat slowly and enjoy their food, but then they see you scarfing down a sandwich while talking on the phone, it will be hard to take you seriously. Model what you want your kids to do when it comes to eating: sit down and eat slowly, eat at the table with family, eat well balanced meals, eat REGULAR meals (i.e. don’t skip meals), etc. You are a HUGE role model to your children. If you don’t want your kids to do it, don’t do it yourself.

4.       Reframe the cultural messages. Media teaches children that thin is in, fat is bad, food is for pleasure, and other things that are not true. Since we can’t get rid of the media or change the images it portrays, talk to your kids about the messages that the media portrays. Teach them that health is about more than just being a size two. Pay attention to their self-image. And be careful with your language, especially if you have some self-image issues too. If they hear you talk about how awful you look in those jeans, they will think their body’s worth is based on image alone.

5.       Don’t you the “D” word. Dieting. DON’T USE IT! The word diet has a bad connotation and children will think they are being deprived if you use the word “diet”.  Instead, talk about healthy eating and lifestyle changes.

6.       Cook with your kids. When kids have a role in the cooking and planning of meals, they feel more empowered. Bring them into the kitchen, let them help plan meals, take them grocery shopping with you. When at the store, tell them benefits of some food (“blueberries help your memory”) and let them pick interesting things that maybe you wouldn’t have tried like white asparagus. By getting them active in this aspect of their life, they feel like they have more control over what they eat. 

Posted 222 weeks ago

Broaden Your Fitness Horizons

I hate to admit it. I really do. But here goes.  Since starting my career in the fitness industry a few years ago, I have to say I have been very prejudiced and biased. I was taught the “heavy weight/power lifting” and hard core cardio methods of training as a newbie in the field. And I never really ventured out of that arena. So that’s what I have stuck to and that’s how I have trained myself and my clients for the past few years. However, over the past several months I have tried to spread my wings and try new things.

About a month ago I took my first barre class: booty barre. For those of you who are unfamiliar with barre classes, these are strengthening and stretching workouts that focus on womens’ “problem” areas such as the hips, thighs, abs, and arms. The main piece of equipment in the class is a ballet “barre”..hence the name “barre workout”.  

Anyway…I was kind of tossed into this class against my will and went in with a negative attitude. I thought, “Oh this class is some sissy dance class where we plié and crap like that.” And when the instructor came in, that just further enhanced my bias. I kid you not, she was about 4’10 and 85 pounds. I was like “THIS IS A JOKE RIGHT?!”

I was completely wrong. This was a…different experience to say that least. As I said, I am used to heavy weight and low reps. This class however focused on light weight (with the use of resistance bands) and RIDICULOUSLY HIGH REPS!!! It was a COMPLETELY different burn than I was used to. There is a distinct difference between the burn of heavy weight/low reps, and a relatively light weight with 4583049738 reps. You know what I mean??? So if you have never checked out a barre class, give it a shot. You are definitely in for a treat.

So today I ventured out of my arena again and tried yoga for the first time. HOLY. CRAP. I thought I was going to fall down the stairs trying to leave the gym my legs were so shaky. Again I went in with a higher than mighty attitude. I thought “If I can squat 200 lbs, I can do some yoga.” TOTALLY DIFFERENT BALLGAME my friends. I think I spent 55 minutes of the hour we were there in a squatted position. Every time our instructor Tiffany told us to go back to “goddess pose” I mentally flipped her off. But I have to say it was a great workout. I haven’t had my legs feel like Jell-O in quite some time.

So the moral of this post is to tell you all to try new things. Yes, if you want to gain strength and size heavy lifting is best. And yes, if you want to burn and lose body fat, high intensity cardio is awesome! But fit in that yoga class or that barre class or that tai chi class every now and then. It is always good to open yourself up to new things, not only in fitness but in life itself. 

Posted 225 weeks ago
<p><span>One need never put a lid on a bucket of crabs. Why, you ask? Because whenever one crab tries to escape to freedom, the others will inevitably pull him back down. Now let’s equate this to life. There are many people out there who hate to see you succeed. They never want to see you do better or outperform them whether it be in the sporting field or in the business arena. The best thing you can do is avoid these “crabs.” Surround yourself with like minded, successful people and see how much your life improves.</span></p>

One need never put a lid on a bucket of crabs. Why, you ask? Because whenever one crab tries to escape to freedom, the others will inevitably pull him back down. Now let’s equate this to life. There are many people out there who hate to see you succeed. They never want to see you do better or outperform them whether it be in the sporting field or in the business arena. The best thing you can do is avoid these “crabs.” Surround yourself with like minded, successful people and see how much your life improves.

Posted 225 weeks ago
<p><span>On the left is me when I was probably my heaviest (pushing 200 lbs). A couple of years after that photo was taken, I realized how miserable I was in my own skin. I was tired of being the big girl. The shy girl. The quiet girl that never went out of her comfort zone to talk to people. So I changed. I decided to lose the weight. Being young and naive I just stopped eating and became the dreaded skinny fat, a smaller version (108 lbs) of the same person. I entered college and gained a lot of the weight back from wasted Wednesdays, thirsty Thursdays, and binge drinking on the weekend. Seeing how that was again ruining my body (and my gpa) I got a job at a gym and started shadowing a trainer. Fast forward a few years and you have the girl on the right. A girl who has learned so much about herself and changed her lifestyle for the better. A girl who has learned to respect her body and treat it properly. And most importantly a girl who has developed a passion to help others achieve their fitness goals as well. You can do anything you put your mind to. Will it be difficult? Heck yes. But will it be worth it? More than you know. Dream big dreams. And then make them happen.</span></p>

On the left is me when I was probably my heaviest (pushing 200 lbs). A couple of years after that photo was taken, I realized how miserable I was in my own skin. I was tired of being the big girl. The shy girl. The quiet girl that never went out of her comfort zone to talk to people. So I changed. I decided to lose the weight. Being young and naive I just stopped eating and became the dreaded skinny fat, a smaller version (108 lbs) of the same person. I entered college and gained a lot of the weight back from wasted Wednesdays, thirsty Thursdays, and binge drinking on the weekend. Seeing how that was again ruining my body (and my gpa) I got a job at a gym and started shadowing a trainer. Fast forward a few years and you have the girl on the right. A girl who has learned so much about herself and changed her lifestyle for the better. A girl who has learned to respect her body and treat it properly. And most importantly a girl who has developed a passion to help others achieve their fitness goals as well. You can do anything you put your mind to. Will it be difficult? Heck yes. But will it be worth it? More than you know. Dream big dreams. And then make them happen.

Posted 225 weeks ago
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Posted 227 weeks ago

New Years' Resolutions

Now that Christmas is over and all the hustle and bustle has settled down, we have time to sit, relax, and think about what is to come. As 2014 approaches, many of us, me included, are attempting to set goals for the new year. One of the most common New Years’ resolutions is to get in shape/lose weight.

This is an awesome goal and I commend people for making the decision to better their health and their life! However, I see all too often that by February, when resolutioners haven’t reached their goal of losing 50 pounds (that they initially gave themselves all year to do), they give up. But come on people! Let’s be realistic. Can you really lose 50 pounds in 30 days? Sure. It’s called liposuction. Or starving.

Besides not having the money to have fat suctioned off one’s body nor the self-discipline to starve oneself, these are a short term solutions anyway. In both scenarios, weight loss will be quick and substantial. However, since you did not change your lifestyle and we can’t realistically starve ourselves forever, the weight comes spiraling back on once a “normal” lifestyle is reimplemented.  

So when it comes to making your resolutions, make sure you keep them realistic. Don’t make your goal to lose 50 pounds in 30 days. It’s just not going to happen. Setting goals like that are setting you up for failure. And follow the K-I-S-S principle: keep it simple and specific. Don’t just say “I am going to workout this year.” Say, “I am going to workout for 30 minutes every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.” This way you can hold yourself accountable. If you just say you are going to work out this year, you can keep blowing it off and say “I’ll do it tomorrow.”  

So as 2014 looms nearer, go ahead and make your resolutions. Stick to the guidelines and make this year the year you follow through with those resolutions.

 

Happy New Years’ everyone!!! 

Posted 229 weeks ago
<p>We make our own obstacles. Keep your eyes on the prize. You are your own worst enemy and biggest critic. Stay focused!</p>

We make our own obstacles. Keep your eyes on the prize. You are your own worst enemy and biggest critic. Stay focused!

Posted 232 weeks ago